Episode 21. Ẩn gave the untruthful stories about Pham Ngoc Thao – Ba Quoc also gave the untruthful stories.

Part II. “Super communist spies” who are they?

Chapter 6. “Super communist spies” who are they?

                “At another meeting with Tho the following year, I ask him to list Vietnam’s top spies. (At one point, the CIA estimated there were fifteen thousand of them.) Heading Tho’s list is Pham Xuan An, followed by Dang Tran Duc, also known as Ba Quoc, who succeeded An in working for South Vietnamese intelligence. Two entrepreneurial spies, Vu Ngoc Nha and Pham Ngoc Thao, are listed in third and fourth place.” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 236)

                Exactly as they used to say to 9 “super spy” the following:

  1. Mười Hương,
  2. Trần Sĩ Hùng
  3. Tư Cang
  4. Phạm Xuân Ẩn
  5. Vũ Ngọc Nhạ
  6. Lê Hữu Thúy
  7. Ba Quốc (Đặng Trần Đức)
  8. Vũ Hữu Duật
  9. Phạm Ngọc Thảo

                With fine words have wings: “well respected by friends and foes alike, and standing out larger than life, almost a myth.

                Where is the truth?

The truth is: In reality, these super spies were just a bunch of baloney, they were the former low level staffs of South Vietnam government (not communist and surely not North Vietnam communist spies), Pham Ngoc Thao was not a communist for any moment. The Communist Party just made it up to deceive the Vietnamese people into believing that “We are the Best!” and we defeated the South Vietnam by “intelligence” not just by:

                “Roasting the less fortunate on the brutal flame
Burying the little infants under the disastrous tunnel.
Lying to the Almighty, cheating its people in numerous ways.
..”

                Muoi Huong and his accomplices (they are “phony communism – Ho Chi Minh Communist” killing “real Communists – Communist Nguyen Ai Quoc”) has been appointed to govern and supervise them Pham Xuan An!
They: Have the following common characteristics:

  1. Tell the family in the North, but the story about it very vague.
  2. Storytelling is lying, lies and illogical.
  3. Achievements are great but are suspected and monitored.
  4. Be supervision to die.
  5. There are signs of poisoning.
  6. Dead relatively sudden.
  7. Occasions 2000 to 2002 and appeared frantic /

Pham Ngoc Thao, there are many signs that are not!

We jointly study:

Episode 21. Ẩn gave the untruthful stories about Pham Ngoc Thao – Ba Quoc also gave the untruthful stories.

  1. In summary:
  2. Both 2 Super Spy Communists – is the author of two works Anti-Communist!

                (Storytelling same motifs 1.)

  1. “Pham Ngoc Thao” is the author of “agrovilles
  2. “Pham Xuan An” is the author of “strategic hamlets.”
  1. Besides Tuyên was 3 “Super spies Communist”.

                (Storytelling same motifs 2.)

  1. Phạm Xuân Ẩn.

                Note:At times, it looked as if An were the sole man Tuyen trusted in Saigon.

  1. Ba Quoc – Dang Tran Duc – also was “Super spies Communist” and also was assistant of Tuyen.

                Note:Ba Quoc became the staff assistant to the director of the Domestic Intelligence Department. He had access to the most important documents in the South’s intelligence network.“?

  1. Pham Ngoc Thao – also was “Super spies Communist” and also was assistant of Tuyen.

(Đại tá Phạm Ngọc Thảo cũng là Siêu điệp viên Cộng Sản và cũng là trợ thủ của Tuyến.)

Note:Thao also became a renowned coup specialist, often collaborating with Dr. TuyenThao operated as one of the most trusted aides to Diem

Reviews: Tran Kim Tuyen  = “A girl does not wear pants!”

Never!

Why “a singleton operating within a denied area operation.12 but An was aware of Thao’s mission“?

An open mouth is Thao die?

Never!

III. Tran Kim Tuyen was 2 “Super spies Communist” … “saved Tuyen’s life”.

(Storytelling same motifs 3.)

Reviews: Formidable: I am not the only one who saved Tuyen’s life; Thao did too“.

Based on what to say: “Tuyen helped free so many of our prisoners”?

after he fell out of favor with Nhu and Diem” how to: “Tuyen helped free so many of our prisoners“?

One who has disgraced – how to: “Tuyen helped free so many of our prisoners“?

  1. Tran Kim Tuyen am?
  2. a poor anti-Communist spy detector Dr. Tuyen .
  3. Tuyen was a fierce anti-Communist!
  1. Ba Quoc – Dang Tran Duc also gave the untruthful stories.

Reviews: I was acquainted with Hai Trung,I wanted to establish contact with him in order to elicit information from him. I reported my intentions to my superiors, but I received instructions forbidding contact with him.

  1. General comments: If properly – Demonstrate all 3 not Communists!
  1. In detail:
  2. Both 2 Super Spy Communists – is the author of two works Anti-Communist!

                (Storytelling same motifs 1.)

  1. “Pham Ngoc Thao” is the author of “agrovilles

“Perhaps the most intriguing case of espionage involved Colonel Pham Ngoc Thao, whose mission was to destabilize the anti-Communist government of South Vietnam. Thao also became a renowned coup specialist, often collaborating with Dr. Tuyen and ARVN generals, doing whatever he could to discredit the South Vietnamese government. Shaplen described Thao as a “conspiratorial revolutionary figure straight out of a Malraux novel.”56

Thao and An were friends, and although An was aware of Thao’s mission, he never spoke a word of it to Thao, who was also close to Bob Shaplen and Dr. Tuyen. Thao operated as one of the most trusted aides to Diem and was generally hailed as one of the South’s most successful anti-Communist crusaders. After seeing Thao’s performance at Ben Tre province, a Communist stronghold, Shaplen wrote an article praising his skills at counterinsurgency.

Coming from an educated Southern Catholic family, Thao was introduced by his parents to Ngo Dinh Thuc, the older brother of Diem, who was then bishop of Vinh Long. Thao convinced Diem’s eldest brother that he truly believed in the anti-Communist cause and wanted to support Diem in any way he could. Thao’s mission had been approved at the highest level of the politburo. Thao was sent to study at the U.S. Command and Staff College in Kansas, and he was promoted to the rank of colonel. He served as commander of the Regional Forces Group in Vinh Long province, then commander of the Regional Forces Group in Binh Duong province, and later as the Ben Tre province chief.

Thao became one of the strongest advocates for agrovilles, self-contained modern villages aimed at separating insurgents from the rural population by moving peasants into large, well-defended villages that would allow the government to protect them. Thao knew the program would alienate peasants, and that is why he became its strongest proponent.57 The peasants hated agrovilles for many reasons, beginning with the fact that they were required to help build them and then move from their homes. The program produced protests and alienation toward Diem. When it was disbanded, Thao focused on strategic hamlets, convincing Diem to move quickly rather than slowly, which would elevate hostility and alienate the peasants. “Instead of testing and testing, they moved ahead in the typical American way, with Thao’s help,” An said. “Thao had a much different mission than me. I was strategic intelligence; he was regime destabilization and coup plotting. His mission was much more dangerous than mine.”

I asked An why so many people admired Thao. “Bob Shaplen liked him because he thought Thao’s mentality was separate and different from Hanoi. Thao was a dreamer, like many of us.” Thao’s close childhood friend explained that “Thao was a man who, throughout his life, fought single-mindedly for Vietnam’s independence. He was a nationalist, not an ideologue, one whose attitudes and goals were shaped at a time when Vietnam was a politically suppressed and economically exploited colony of France…. Looking back at his life, it is hardly an exaggeration to say that he personally changed the balance of political power between the Saigon government and the NLF. He helped weaken Diem and Nhu by assisting in the debacle of their rural pacification schemes, and he was a major figure in the whirlwind of plots that undermined and eventually destroyed them.”58

Thao was killed on July 17, 1965. Nguyen Van Thieu is supposed to have given the order for the execution that involved strangulating the severely wounded Thao with leather thongs around the throat and testicles. Thieu broke out champagne with his wife to celebrate Thao’s death.59….” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 19/27)

  1. “Pham Xuan An” is the author of “strategic hamlets.”

                “An describes how he accompanied Hickey when he went out to examine Vietnam’s agrovilles—Diem’s first strategy for fighting the Communists.

If revolutionaries swim like fish in the sea of peasant life, the way to kill them is to dry up the sea. First, you remove the peasants from the countryside and relocate them into fortified enclaves known as agrovilles.  The only people remaining in the countryside will be, by definition, revolutionaries, who can be bombed or gassed out of existence. In practice, Diem’s agrovilles  were forced labor camps full of alienated peasants.

They flew the Republican flag by day and nurtured the revolutionaries by night. Diem was forced to abandon this initial experiment in counterterrorism after a year, but he and his American advisers refloated the scheme again in the 1960s, when agrovilles  were renamed “strategic hamlets.”

“I liked Gerry Hickey,” An says. “He was very intelligent and always cheerful. He wanted to find a political solution for the war. Unfortunately, people didn’t listen to him.” It was Hickey’s long-held belief that Vietnam’s warring parties should negotiate their own settlement.

When Hickey and other Americans came to visit the president’s office, An was tasked with showing them the agrovilles.

“I took them across the Mekong River into Kien Hoa province (the old Ben Tre province). They were pacifying that area. It was infested with Viet Minh after the First Indochina War. A year after it was started, the program failed. Dr. Tuyen gave me a car and asked me to visit the agrovilles  and report to him on what I found. He knew that people were lying to him, the district chiefs and province chiefs. He needed someone he could trust, who could go out in the field and give him a secret report on what was really happening. I drove all the way to Rach Gia, on the Gulf of Thailand in the south. Then from there I drove through central Vietnam to Hué in the north. I came back and reported to Dr. Tuyen, ‘The agrovilles  program is finished. Forget about it. You have to do something new.’ That’s why he dropped the agrovilles  and switched, with the help of the Americans, to building strategic hamlets.”

An’s handling of this assignment reveals how he became a trusted adviser to so many South Vietnamese and American officials. When asked to study a sensitive military issue, he examines the matter firsthand, like an investigative journalist, and returns with a blunt report: “Your strategy is not working.

Find a new strategy.” At the end of the day, he looks like the one honest man in Vietnam, the person to consult for confidential evaluation of what is really happening. He tells the truth to Dr. Tuyen. He tells the truth to his Communist handlers. It is the same truth but it has different meanings, depending on who is hearing it. Tuyen confronts a strategic weakness that needs fixing. The Communists learn about a strategic weakness that can be exploited.

An protected his cover by telling his Western bosses the same truth he told to his Communist comrades. But what happens when this “truth” is converted into a chess piece and projected forward on the board, five or six moves ahead? What does it mean that a Communist spy advised the South Vietnamese government on how to build more effective fortifica-tions in the countryside? After all, the move from agrovilles  to strategic hamlets entailed an increased military presence, beefed up armaments, and more coercion and brutality directed at Vietnam’s peasants. Is An’s advice an example of compartmentalization? Was he thinking like a Westerner by day and a Communist by night? Or was there something deeper at work? If you immiserate the populace, uproot and brutalize them, will they become increasingly ardent in their support for the Communists? Was An offering “information” or “disinformation” or some third category of “truth”? In any case, he was now launched on the career that would make him at once the most trusted adviser and the most effective spy in twentieth-century Vietnamese history.

As we sit talking in his living room, An keeps himself positioned near the telephone and a pad of paper, and there is always a pen tucked in his breast pocket. Old colleagues call to ask him out for coffee. Foreign visitors request meetings. News arrives that old friends have died. An keeps these conversations brief. We always return to where we left off. In this case, I ask him what he means when he talks about an area being infested with Viet Minh in need of pacification.

“I use this language because I had to think like an American,”

he says. “I had to think like a nationalist. If I had thought like a Communist, I would have been finished, finished completely.” ” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 122)

  1. Besides Tuyên was 3 “Super spies Communist”. ( Ba Quoc, Thao and An got their start in organization of Tuyen.)

(Storytelling same motifs 2.)

  1. Phạm Xuân Ẩn.

                “On returning to Saigon, An was so frightened about of having been exposed as a spy that he hid in his house for a month before settling on a plan of action: rather than waiting for the police to come and arrest him, he would go to the police and learn what they knew about him. Using his family connections, he contacted Tran Kim Tuyen, the former military surgeon who ran South Vietnam’s intelligence network for President Ngo Dinh Diem and his younger brother Ngo Dinh Nhu.

This extensive, CIA-supported network of spies and clandestine military forces operated out of the president’s cabinet under the anodyne name of the Office of Political, Cultural, and Social Research. If Tuyen hired him, An figured he would be safe from arrest, at least for the moment.

In short order, An became Tuyen’s assistant, his factotum and confidant. At times, it looked as if An were the sole man Tuyen trusted in Saigon. ” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 121)

                Note:At times, it looked as if An were the sole man Tuyen trusted in Saigon.

  1. Ba Quoc – Dang Tran Duc – also was “Super spies Communist” and also was assistant of Tuyen.

Tuyen’s other loyal assistant, Ba Quoc (the code name of Intelligence Major General Dang Tran Duc), passed a few lie detector tests and was soon transferred to the newly created CIO, where he picked up the nickname “Buddha Ta” because he seemed to be “as gentle as Buddha.” Ba Quoc became the staff assistant to the director of the Domestic Intelligence Department. He had access to the most important documents in the South’s intelligence network.” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 19/27)

Note:Ba Quoc became the staff assistant to the director of the Domestic Intelligence Department. He had access to the most important documents in the South’s intelligence network.“?

  1. Pham Ngoc Thao – also was “Super spies Communist” and also was assistant of Tuyen.

“Perhaps the most intriguing case of espionage involved Colonel Pham Ngoc Thao, whose mission was to destabilize the anti-Communist government of South Vietnam. Thao also became a renowned coup specialist, often collaborating with Dr. Tuyen and ARVN generals, doing whatever he could to discredit the South Vietnamese government. Shaplen described Thao as a “conspiratorial revolutionary figure straight out of a Malraux novel.”56

Thao and An were friends, and although An was aware of Thao’s mission, he never spoke a word of it to Thao, who was also close to Bob Shaplen and Dr. Tuyen. Thao operated as one of the most trusted aides to Diem and was generally hailed as one of the South’s most successful anti-Communist crusaders. After seeing Thao’s performance at Ben Tre province, a Communist stronghold, Shaplen wrote an article praising his skills at counterinsurgency.” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 19/27)

Note:Thao also became a renowned coup specialist, often collaborating with Dr. TuyenThao operated as one of the most trusted aides to Diem

Reviews: Tran Kim Tuyen  = “A girl does not wear pants!”

Never!

Why “a singleton operating within a denied area operation.12 but An was aware of Thao’s mission“?

An open mouth is Thao die?

Never!

III. Tran Kim Tuyen was 2 “Super spies Communist” … “saved Tuyen’s life”.

(Storytelling same motifs 3.)

This was one of the few times in all our conversations that An’s tone changed. “There are things I cannot tell you, but I am not the only one who saved Tuyen’s life; Thao did too because Tuyen helped free so many of our prisoners after he fell out of favor with Nhu and Diem!” After the November 1, 1963 coup that removed Diem from office, Tuyen flew to Saigon from Hong Kong, but was immediately imprisoned as a suspected plotter. He spent over two months in prison, isolated, tortured, and starved, left naked and living with rats.60

It was Thao, the respected ARVN colonel, who used his influence to get Tuyen released. “Dr. Tuyen was my friend,” says An. “He was Thao’s friend too, and we saved his life because he helped our people in prison. This should tell you something about our friendship.” At the time I recalled thinking that there were just too many boxes within boxes in An’s life.

…60. Shaplen’s 1975 notes record the following answer by Tuyen to the question of what had prison been like: “Tuyen: arrested, put in solitary, naked, 5 weeks, 2 dishes of rice a day, half cooked, no other food, small bottle tap water, vomited blood, very sick. Spent 73 days in jail, let out Nov. 2.” Box 93, Shaplen Papers.” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 20/27)

Reviews: Formidable: I am not the only one who saved Tuyen’s life; Thao did too“.

Based on what to say: “Tuyen helped free so many of our prisoners”?

after he fell out of favor with Nhu and Diem” how to: “Tuyen helped free so many of our prisoners“?

One who has disgraced – how to: “Tuyen helped free so many of our prisoners“?

  1. Tran Kim Tuyen am?
  2. a poor anti-Communist spy detector Dr. Tuyen .

In one of our final conversations, I joked about what a poor anti-Communist spy detector Dr. Tuyen turned out to be since Ba Quoc, Thao and An got their start in his organization.” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 20/27)

  1. Tuyen was a fierce anti-Communist!

ON SATURDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 12, 1957, thirty-year-old Pham Xuan An arrived in California. He was fortunate to have made it because his visa had been mired in the bureaucratic depths of the Vietnamese immigration office.2 In desperation, An called a cousin who worked for the youngest of the Ngo brothers, Ngo Dinh Can, the overlord of central Vietnam, to see if anything could be done to expedite things. An’s file was referred to Dr. Tran Kim Tuyen with instructions to check with the Americans about An’s character and loyalties. Lansdale’s recommendation alone was sufficient for Tuyen to arrange immediate clearance of An’s paperwork, making the trip to the United States possible. From this moment forward, the lives of Communist spy Pham Xuan An and one of Vietnam’s most ardent anti-Communists, Dr. Tran Kim Tuyen, would be forever interwoven.

Tuyen was head of the Service d’Études Politiques et Sociales (Bureau of Political and Social Research), which was referred to by the James Bond-esque acronym SEPES. Operating in an annex building within the Presidential Palace and reporting directly to President Diem’s brother Ngo Dinh Nhu, the office had close ties with the CIA and was staffed only with those most loyal to Nhu and Tuyen. This palace intelligence and security service was a secret police unit that had its tentacles in every part of South Vietnamese life.3 From a prominent anti-Communist Catholic family in Phat Diem, a Catholic enclave in the north, Tuyen had been an early recruit of the Ngo brothers.4 Nhu had come to regard Tuyen “as his fixer, a man with enough contacts in every corner of Vietnamese society to succeed with any project, large or small.”5

….3. Nguyen Thai, Is South Vietnam Viable? (Manila, Philippines: Carmelo and Bauermann, 1962), 209; William Colby, Lost Victory: A Firsthand Account of America’s Sixteen-Year Involvement in Vietnam (New York: Contemporary Books, 1989), 39.

  1. Robert Shaplen, The Lost Revolution (Revised edition, Harper & Row) 158.
  2. A. J. Langguth, Our Vietnam: The War, 1954–1975 (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000), 105.” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 3, Page 1/20)

“A tiny man weighing less than a hundred pounds, Tuyen “projected the quiet and shy air of the Confucian scholar,” wrote William Colby.2 Beneath the surface, however, Tuyen was a fierce anti-Communist and master schemer and coup plotter. Tuyen had studied but never practiced medicine, yet his power was so great everyone addressed him as “Bac Si,” or Dr. Tuyen. He trusted only a few loyal anti-Communist friends within his organization.3

…3. Interview with Nguyen Thai.”(Perfect Spy, Chapter 3, Page 1/27)

Reviews: Perhaps Tran Kim Tuyen not: “a poor anti-Communist spy detector Dr. Tuyen “!

  1. Ba Quoc – Dang Tran Duc also gave the untruthful stories.

 “Here was further evidence that the North Vietnamese Communist spy network had completely infiltrated virtually every layer of South Vietnam society, including the very intelligence agencies in South Vietnam that were responsible for eradicating the Viet Cong. Yet there seems to have been no counterpart agents to Pham Xuan An or Ba Quoc operating in the North, which is probably why U.S. intelligence tried unsuccessfully at least twice to recruit An to work for the CIA.

Ba Quoc had no idea that An was working undercover: “I was acquainted with Hai Trung, but I knew only that he was a journalist working for the American who had a lot of influence and who had a very wide circle of contacts…. Because I knew that he was a person with considerable influence, I wanted to establish contact with him in order to elicit information from him. I reported my intentions to my superiors, but I received instructions forbidding contact with him.” An was similarly unaware of Ba Quoc’s role.55” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 19/27)

Reviews: I was acquainted with Hai Trung,I wanted to establish contact with him in order to elicit information from him. I reported my intentions to my superiors, but I received instructions forbidding contact with him.”

Get instructions from anybody?

If it is true that “communist spy” – they must pretend “Anti-Communist” terribly!

An indiscreet how: “I (Ba Quoc) wanted to establish contact with him in order to elicit information from him.“?

Story lies!

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